5 Data-Driven Strategies for Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Curriculum

5-Data-Driven-Strategies-for-SEL-Curriculum.jpg

An important part of shifting school culture is addressing the social and emotional learning (SEL) needs of the student body. Implementing new SEL curricula and practices can help to decrease incidents of negative student behavior and promote positive school culture that will improve student achievement.

An important part of shifting school culture is addressing the social and emotional learning (SEL) needs of the student body. Implementing new SEL curricula and practices can help to decrease incidents of negative student behavior and promote positive school culture that will improve student achievement.

Once school leaders have implemented an SEL initiative, using a program that monitors competency growth is critical. SEL measurement data provides leaders, teachers, and students, with insight on SEL skills and helps to identify areas of improvement.

Schools can implement both positive behavior supports and SEL but must monitor and measure each to determine their effectiveness. In order to improve outcomes for students, schools have to strategically measure and monitor the progress of their SEL curriculum implementation. Are students’ SEL skills improving?

See how Kickboard supports SEL programs

5 Data-driven Strategies for SEL Curriculum

Collect SEL data

Many schools skip the important step of collecting data in the first place. Implementing a tool that measures student SEL progress is helpful insight into student development. Tools for real-time recording of behaviors and social-emotional skills are one effective approach for data collection and analysis. SEL data can be used to identify a baseline, set realistic goals, and monitor progress. Data should directly inform school culture decisions made by school leaders.

Measure effectiveness

Measuring the effectiveness of a SEL curriculum can be achieved in different ways. Schools can use climate surveys as a way to gain a broad understanding of school culture. Surveys can also provide information on how SEL skills are developing for individual students.

Schools can also use behavior management programs to collect concrete data on SEL competencies in real-time. This provides information for long- and short-term plans for student development and can track progress toward a goal.

Monitor progress

After introducing students to a new behavior practice within the SEL curriculum, use a tool that helps to determine how students are advancing. Think about using that data as a guide to develop an action plan for future SEL lessons. Identify any areas that need instruction or modeling and then determine how it should be implemented and reassessed.

Celebrate success

The data collected not only helps to inform any needed changes, but also to identify areas of positive results. This is important because it identifies where instruction and practice have been successful for students. If they are learning and are able to demonstrate growth, take note and continue to implement those practices to continue success. Celebrate the development that you see and encourage students to continue to use their SEL skills.

Plan for future growth 

As you continue to repeat the cycle of using data to inform decisions, you can also use it to plan for future initiatives. As you learn more about the success of your SEL implementation, think about how it can be scaled to best serve your student body. Perhaps you should think about implementing the SEL curriculum, school or districtwide. If it is already being used wide-spread, consider plans for innovative ways to sustain the growth of the students. Focus on opportunities to use the data to inform instruction or connect to other learning and instructional strategies being used.

Having a platform or tool like Kickboard can provide detailed information that can influence schoolwide action plans. The data can be used in multiple ways to inform practice and provide information about your SEL curriculum implementation that will have a direct impact on student outcomes.